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Traumatic Asphyxia

Asphyxiation Traumatic


Presentation

  • The epidemiology of traumatic asphyxia in Zimbabwe is unknown but the conditions predisposing to it are present.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • OBJECTIVE: The present study was undertaken to examine specific features of unintentional traumatic asphyxial deaths in childhood.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Two cases of benign cervical prevertebral soft tissue swelling following traumatic asphyxia are presented.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Craniofacial injuries also present with fatal ecchymosis and haematoma formation due to the underlying skeletal injuries which may require active management.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We present here ultrasonographic evidence that the inferior vena cava is compressed or obliterated during a Valsalva maneuver, and propose that this compression protects the lower torso during traumatic asphyxia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Soft Tissue Swelling
  • Two cases of benign cervical prevertebral soft tissue swelling following traumatic asphyxia are presented.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Death in Childhood
  • OBJECTIVE: The present study was undertaken to examine specific features of unintentional traumatic asphyxial deaths in childhood.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Sore Throat
  • In our series, sore throat, hoarseness, dizziness, numbness, and headaches were common. Profound lower leg pitting edema, hemoptysis, hemotympanum, and transient visual loss were noted. Chest radiographic findings were normal in all patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Hoarseness
  • In our series, sore throat, hoarseness, dizziness, numbness, and headaches were common. Profound lower leg pitting edema, hemoptysis, hemotympanum, and transient visual loss were noted. Chest radiographic findings were normal in all patients.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Oral Bleeding
  • He was cyanotic in his face and had a tire mark from the left shoulder to the right abdomen, petechiae on the head, face, conjunctiva and chest, oral bleeding, and facial edema.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Retinal Hemorrhage
  • Open Access Clinical Images First Online: 01 August 2009 Keywords Purpura Glasgow Coma Scale Retinal Hemorrhage Exophthalmos Deep Breath These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors.[doi.org]
  • They say that intracranial and retinal hemorrhages have been surprisingly infrequent in traumatic traumatic asphyxia patients, with the prognosis for vision usually good and vision loss temporary.[aao.org]
  • Visual disturbances occur in some cases [9], secondary to the same mechanism as neurological involvement with multiple presentations: retinal hemorrhage, retrobulbar hemorrhage and vitreous exudates [2].[ijcasereportsandimages.com]
  • At ocular level there may be exophthalmos, double vision, loss of visual acuity, and blurry vision, these alterations are explained by retinal hemorrhages [ 12 ].[casereports.in]
Diplopia
  • Proptosis and diplopia resolved completely over six weeks. Visual disorders may be overlooked as a complication of trauma.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Neck Pain
  • Neither were associated with neck pain, neck tenderness, or mechanism of injury associated with cervical injury, and each resolved spontaneously.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Skin Discoloration
  • Skin discoloration resolved within 3 weeks. Complete resolution of subconjunctival hemorrhage occurred 1 month later. In our series, sore throat, hoarseness, dizziness, numbness, and headaches were common.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Facial Petechiae
  • Traumatic asphyxia is an uncommon syndrome of craniocervical cyanosis, facial petechiae, and subconjunctival hemorrhages following severe crush injury to the thorax. Ocular manifestations of the syndrome have rarely been reported.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • While the facial petechiae per se are of little consequence, the attendant injuries to other organ systems can be serious and even fatal.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Abstract Compression of the chest causing facial petechiae, violaceous facial hue, subconjunctival hemorrhages, and frequent mental status abnormalities has been termed traumatic asphyxia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • All of these findings (conjunctival/facial petechiae, craniofacial congestion/swelling) were present in all of our patients.[link.springer.com]
Facial Petechiae
  • Traumatic asphyxia is an uncommon syndrome of craniocervical cyanosis, facial petechiae, and subconjunctival hemorrhages following severe crush injury to the thorax. Ocular manifestations of the syndrome have rarely been reported.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • While the facial petechiae per se are of little consequence, the attendant injuries to other organ systems can be serious and even fatal.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Abstract Compression of the chest causing facial petechiae, violaceous facial hue, subconjunctival hemorrhages, and frequent mental status abnormalities has been termed traumatic asphyxia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • All of these findings (conjunctival/facial petechiae, craniofacial congestion/swelling) were present in all of our patients.[link.springer.com]
Neck Edema
  • The patient had facial purple congestion, diffuse head and neck edema and petechiae in the entire face, neck and upper chest (Figure 1).[ijcasereportsandimages.com]
Microscopic Hematuria
  • Microscopic hematuria was noted in one patient. Diagnosis is made from the history and characteristic appearance of the patient. Treatment is directed to the associated injury.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Workup

  • During workup a comprehensive metabolic panel and a complete blood count were normal. An arterial blood gas showed mild acute respiratory alkalosis. An electrocardiogram showed normal sinus rhythm. Troponin levels were within normal limits.[casereports.in]
Normal Electrocardiogram
  • Coronary artery contusion, malignant arrhythmias, and a normal electrocardiogram were also noted and discussed. The relevant literature was reviewed.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • Treatment is directed to the associated injury. Oxygen supplement with head elevation to 30 degrees is the mainstay of treatment. If the patient survives the initial insult, the prognosis is excellent.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • The treatment includes rapid chest decompression and cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The prognosis is good but a prolonged thoracic compression could lead to cerebral anoxia and neurological sequelae.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Clinicians managing trauma patients should be well aware of these two different entities which may occur separately or simultaneously so as to ensure correct and adequate treatment.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Prompt treatment with attention to the reestablishment of oxygenation and perfusion may result in good outcomes.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Get clear, concise descriptions and evidence-based treatment guidelines for a full range of clinical conditions, ranging from the common to the unusual.[books.google.com]

Prognosis

  • All of them made a good prognosis.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • If the patient survives the initial insult, the prognosis is excellent.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • They say that intracranial and retinal hemorrhages have been surprisingly infrequent in traumatic traumatic asphyxia patients, with the prognosis for vision usually good and vision loss temporary.[aao.org]
  • Traumatic asphyxia has a good prognosis. Supportive treatment such as oxygenation and elevation of the head to 30 is usually sufficient in the management of these patients. However, specific treatments may be needed for the associated injuries.[doi.org]
  • The prognosis is usually favorable and depends on several factors such as age, time of compression and associated injuries. Contributors : ROJ: patient management, literature review, KVB: literature review, writing manuscript.[casereports.in]

Etiology

  • Other etiologies of Perthes syndrome are: motor vehicle crashes, crushing in a panicked crowd, entrapment beneath vehicles or falling down in a narrow space [5].[ijcasereportsandimages.com]
  • Introduction Asphyxia derives from the Greek words a “without” and sphyxis, “heartbeat” is a condition of deficient tissue oxygenation leading to hypoxia with different etiologies.[casereports.in]

Epidemiology

  • The epidemiology of traumatic asphyxia in Zimbabwe is unknown but the conditions predisposing to it are present.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Neurology and Neurosurgery Czech and Slovak Ophthalmology Czech and Slovak Psychiatry Czech Geriatric Review Czech Gynaecology Czech Rheumatology Czech Dental Journal Czech Urology Czech-Slovak Dermatology Czecho-Slovak Pathology Czech-Slovak Pediatrics Epidemiology[prolekare.cz]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • A case of traumatic asphyxia is reported, and its clinical and pathophysiologic features are discussed.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • A thorough understanding of the involved pathophysiology coupled with aggressive cardiopulmonary management is essential for patient survival.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Comparing the morphologic findings after suffocation by thoracic compression and traumatic asphyxia the authors attribute independent pathophysiologic significance to traumatic asphyxia.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Traumatic asphyxia in a child is rare and the pathophysiology is different from that occurring in an adult.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Learn more STUDY Flashcards Learn Write Spell Test PLAY Match Gravity Terms in this set (6) Pathophysiology Traumatic asphyxia is associated with sudden compression of the chest.[quizlet.com]

Prevention

  • Cooperative review and modification of stadium policies and design may prevent such events in the future.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Traumatic asphyxia is a form of asphyxia where respiration is prevented by external pressure on the body. A 19-year-old man was found by relatives compressed by motorboat in the garage.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Two cases of traumatic asphyxia due to this preventable hazard occurred in a 5-year period in central New York.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Preventive and therapeutic strategies should focus on the groups and events identified.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Pathophysiology of traumatic asphyxia "Traumatic asphyxia" is defined as "a form of suffocation where respiration is prevented by external pressure on the body".[derangedphysiology.com]

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