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Uncinate Seizure


Presentation

  • Although definitions for most terms are readily available on the Internet, the INS Dictionary presents definitions with a neuropsychological perspective with relevance for neuropsychologists more clearly identified.[books.google.com]
  • […] introduced in or shortly before 1879 by the British neurologist John Hughlings Jackson (1835 1911), as a somewhat paradoxical replacement for the term… … Dictionary of Hallucinations hallucinatory epilepsy — A term used to denote a focal type of epilepsy presenting[medicine.academic.ru]
  • ., identified nine out of 347 patients with intracranial aneurysms (2.6%) presenting with epilepsy. [1] We report a 75-year-old lady who presented with uncinate seizures and had a left internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm on imaging.[jpgmonline.com]
  • Cho, Kim, Noh, Kim, Lee, and Kim: Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy Presenting as Obstructive Type Sleep Apnea Abstract A 20-year-old man presented with sleep apnea. Polysomnography was performed and it revealed nine apneas and two hypopneas.[j-epilepsy.org]
  • Incorporates the Medical Model, the Disablement Model, and the ICF Model Incorporates Preferred Practice Patterns from the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, Second Edition throughout the text Presents key information in at-a-glance format that is[books.google.ro]
Cough
  • An attack of an acute disease or the sudden appearance of some symptom, such as coughing. 2. A convulsion. 3. (plural) epilepsy 4.[medicine.academic.ru]
  • However, it can only be voluntarily suppressed briefly through a distraction effort such as clearing the throat, coughing, etc. It is triggered through episodes of stress.[webmanmed.com]
Sneezing
  • Sneezing so violently it causes you to shake, making it look like you are also having a seizure.2. Sneezing and having a seizure at the same time....[azdictionary.co]
Physician
  • The introduction of the term epilepsy is generally attributed to the Persian physician and… … Dictionary of Hallucinations dreamy state — Also referred to as dreamy mental state and intellectual aura.[medicine.academic.ru]
  • This textbook will prove a useful clinical reference for neurologists and senior trainees in neurology, an educational manual for trainees, and will offer practical assistance to all physicians advising people with epilepsy.[books.google.de]
  • In 1863 he was appointed assistant physician to the London Hospital and lecturer on physiology in the medical school. He became physician in 1874, and remained on the active staff till 1894.[en.wikisource.org]
  • John Hughlings Jackson (1835-1911), the English physician who pioneered the development of neurology as a medical specialty during the reign of Queen Victoria.[ark.no]
High Fever
  • Seizures can have many causes, including medicines, high fevers, head injuries and certain diseases. People who have recurring seizures due to a brain disorder have epilepsy.[icdlist.com]
  • .  The most common type of seizure in children is the febrile seizure, which occurs when an infection associated with a high fever develops.Other reasons for seizures are these:  Metabolic disorders  Drugs  Medications  Poisons  Many yet undiscovered[slideshare.net]
  • Crowing convulsion – laryngismus stridulus Essential convulsion – central convulsion Febrile convulsion – those associated with high fever, occurring in infants and children Hysterical / Hysteroid convulsion – conversion hysteria with symptoms that resemble[webmanmed.com]
  • Lesions or scar tissue may be formed from a previous serious head injury, toxic poisoning, a difficult birth with anoxia (lack of oxygen to the brain) or even a high fever during an illness such as meningitis or encephalitis.[assap.ac.uk]
Disability
  • Seite 118 - ... therapeutic use of self-care, work and play activities to increase independent function, enhance development and prevent disability... ‎ Seite 114 - Levin. HS. High, WM. Goethe, KE, Sisson, RA. Overall, JE, Rhoades, HM.[books.google.com]
  • Incorporates the Medical Model, the Disablement Model, and the ICF Model Incorporates Preferred Practice Patterns from the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, Second Edition throughout the text Presents key information in at-a-glance format that is[books.google.ro]
  • Early diagnosis of this epilepsy syndrome is important because disabling seizures and their consequences can be prevented by surgical treatment, either by resection or ablation.[medlink.com]
  • .  Specific learning disabilities.  Sleep disorders.  Hyperactivity. 42.[slideshare.net]
  • Further studies are necessary to determine whether these personality changes are due to the chronic disability of epilepsy, treatment with AEDs, cognitive dysfunction, or the seizures themselves.[primarypsychiatry.com]
Weakness
  • But it was by the observation of a large number of such cases of convulsions starting locally, by careful examination of the subsequent paralysis or weakness, and the correlation of these with the actual position of the lesion in the brain giving rise[en.wikisource.org]
  • Atonic or akinetic seizures are characterized by loss of body tone that can produce nodding of the head, weakness of the knees, or total collapse and falling. The patient usually remains conscious during the attack. Diagnosis .[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Increasing weakness, apprehension, headache and confusion. Hour 78 (day 4): Third 'spell'. Insomnia, other symptoms increasing. Possible dilated right pupil and possible Babinski on left. Hour 84: Fourth 'spell' during surgery.[powell-pressburger.org]
  • A non-recurrent one-off seizure may also be due to certain environmental factors, such as a weak complex electro-magnetic field or drug use. A person's seizure threshold is their individual level of resistance to seizures.[assap.ac.uk]
Enuresis
  • Ictal orgasms have been reported, although rarely, in association with seizures arising from various cerebral locations. [15] Rare autonomic symptoms include perspiration, lacrimation, ictal enuresis, or flushing.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • No tongue biting was reported, but he reported recent occasional enuresis. Physical examination revealed no apparent abnormalities. His body mass index (BMI) was 23.1 kg/m 2 . Overnight polysomnography was performed.[j-epilepsy.org]
  • […] psychomotor - 弁蓋-:opercular - 片麻痺を示す片側-:hemiconvulsive status with hemiparesis 補足運動野-:supplementary motor area [SMA] - ミオクロニー(発作)-:myoclonic ミオクロニー欠神発作-:myoclonic absence - 有熱性-:febrile - てんかん(性):epileptic/epileptisch(D) -悪夢:- nightmare -閾値:- threshold -遺尿:- enuresis[square.umin.ac.jp]
Nausea
  • […] failure in children, teratogenic (NTDs, lower IQ) Mechanism: Enhances GABA-A mediated response, inhibits sodium current, inhibits glutamate receptors, inhibits T-type calcium channels Indication: Generalized absence Adverse effects: Abdominal pain, nausea[quizlet.com]
  • Symptoms include nausea, pain, hunger, warmth, and "epigastric rising" sensations, and may be associated with piloerection (ie, gooseflesh).[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Toxic side effects are also common and include drowsiness, ataxia, nausea, sedation, and dizziness.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Apparently he would use this method while composing, producing melodic models for his symphonies. 2.- Vertiginous: Meniere's disease is the cause of severe kinesthetic hallucinations , accompanied by nausea, dizziness, and malaise.[priory.com]
  • Although the same region has been implicated in cases of vomiting [ 62 ], ictal nausea and vomiting probably occur following activation of the anterior insula [ 63 ].[karger.com]
Dysgeusia
  • Dysgeusia can be a direct or indirect effect of malign conditions. Hypergeusia and parageusia can occur in psychoses and in the conversion disorder (32).[arquivosdeorl.org.br]
  • Rossetti AO, Mortati KA, Black PM, Bromfield EB: Simple partial seizures with hemisensory phenomena and dysgeusia: an insular pattern. Epilepsia 2005;46:590–591.[karger.com]
Flushing
  • Ictal orgasms have been reported, although rarely, in association with seizures arising from various cerebral locations. [15] Rare autonomic symptoms include perspiration, lacrimation, ictal enuresis, or flushing.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • […] aware) Auras/focal aware may be classified by symptom type, as follows: Sensory – auditory, gustatory, hot-cold sensations, olfactory, somatosensory, vestibular, visual Autonomic – Heart rate Change (asytole, bradycardia, palpitations, tachycardia), flushing[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Other autonomic manifestations, such as mydriasis and flushing, have no specific localizing value, as they may be associated with mesiotemporal, insular and frontal (parasagittal, orbitofrontal) lobe involvement [ 45 ].[karger.com]
Aura
  • In dentistry, the adaptation of any dental restoration, e.g., of an inla … Medical dictionary olfactory aura — The term olfactory aura comes from the Latin words ol(e)facere (to smell) and aura (breeze, smell).[medicine.academic.ru]
  • : lateral temporal • Olfactory auras: uncinate gyrus/mesial temp Automatisms: • Oroalimentary y*: chewing, lipsmacking, repetitive swallowing • Hand/manual l*: repetitive purposeless movements of hands Dysphasia, paraphasic errors- if its on dominant[quizlet.com]
  • Just before a seizure (the preictal stage) the patient may experience an abnormal somatic, visceral, or psychic sensation called an aura. The presence or absence of the aura and its nature (if it is present) should be noted and recorded.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • If it progresses to another kind of seizure it is called an aura.[webmanmed.com]
Dizziness
  • Symptoms include vertigo, a tilting sensation, and vague dizziness. Psychic SPS arise predominantly from the temporal and limbic region, including the amygdala, hippocampus, and parahippocampal gyrus.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • […] awareness 780.03 Persistent vegetative state 780.09 Other alteration of consciousness 780.1 Hallucinations 780.2 Syncope and collapse 780.31 Febrile convulsions (simple), unspecified 780.32 Complex febrile convulsions 780.33 Post traumatic seizures 780.4 Dizziness[healthprovidersdata.com]
  • Toxic side effects are also common and include drowsiness, ataxia, nausea, sedation, and dizziness.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • .- Vertiginous: Meniere's disease is the cause of severe kinesthetic hallucinations , accompanied by nausea, dizziness, and malaise. It may be also have tinnitus, often described as "chirping", or as the sound of crickets.[priory.com]
  • Vertigo might be elicited by the insular-parietal-temporal junction [ 6 , 18 ]; it appears to be a very rare symptom and needs to be differentiated from the much more frequently reported, unspecific prodromal ‘dizziness’.[karger.com]
Atonic Seizures
  • SEIZURES / DROP ATTACKS Atonic seizure -- 2nd generalization Loc: corpus callosum Corpus callosotomy LAFORA / FAMILIAL MYOCLONIC EPILEPSY Epi: mid teens Gen: Ar Sx: myoclonic sz, dementia His: Lafora bodies MoA: accumulation of polyglucosans in neuron[learnneurosurgery.com]
  • Tonic and Atonic Seizures TONIC SEIZURES • Symmetric, tonic muscle contraction of extremities s* with tonic flexion of waist and neck • Duration - 2-20 seconds.[quizlet.com]
  • seizure Atypical absence seizure Auditory seizure Central convulsion Clonic seizure Cognitive seizure Complex part seizure with impairment of consciousness only Complex partial seizure impairment consciousness at onset Complex partial seizure evolving[healthprovidersdata.com]
  • Atonic seizure – an absence seizure characterized by sudden loss of muscle tone.[webmanmed.com]
Deja Vu
  • vu, jamais vu) time after the seizure event, may be characterized by confusion, somnolence, hemiparesis and/or agitation temporal lobe seizures that involve the primary olfactory cortex and begin with an olfactory aura continuous or recurring seizure[quizlet.com]
  • DÄMMERZUSTAND 54 10 220 Alphabetischer Index deutscher Begriffe DÄMMERZUSTAND -, EPILEPTISCHER 98,102,112,118 -, geordneter 144 -, Lennoxscher 59 -, nicht-epileptischer 147 -, postiktaler 85 -, postparoxysmaler 112 Dancing eyes and feet syndrome 11 Deja-vu[docplayer.org]
  • Wild E: Deja vu in neurology. J Neurol 2005;252:1–7. Mendez MF, Cherrier MM, Perryman KM: Epileptic forced thinking from left frontal lesions. Neurology 1996;47:79–83.[karger.com]
Parosmia
  • It is used to denote a type of *aura manifesting itself in the form of an * olfactory hallucination or * parosmia (i.e. an olfactory *illusion) … Dictionary of Hallucinations[medicine.academic.ru]
  • Parosmias are common. Amnesia in the first 24 hours is associated with a permanent anosmia in more than 90% of cases. When smell is partially preserved, a reduction in the distinction of smells has been noticed (17).[arquivosdeorl.org.br]
Olfactory Hallucination
  • Olfactory hallucination are caused by temporal seizures (uncinate fits) but may also be caused by schizophrenia or depression can be caused by temporal lobe hamartoma, mesial temporal sclerosis or a glioma mesial temporal sclerosis is associated with[prod.wiki.cns.org]
  • It is used to denote a type of *aura manifesting itself in the form of an * olfactory hallucination or * parosmia (i.e. an olfactory *illusion) … Dictionary of Hallucinations[medicine.academic.ru]
  • Olfactory hallucinations and auras often accompany temporal lobe seizures ( Chen et al., 2003 ; West & Doty, 1995 ).[neurocritic.blogspot.com]
  • Environmental and Industrial causes The olfactory hallucinations are associated with aural gustatory hallucinations.[meta-religion.com]
  • hallucinations) A utomatisms 33% w/ MTS 66% w/ hx GTC If frontal (SMA) - bicycling movements Focal spikes, diffuse rhythmic activity Adolescents Adults Carbamezepine Dilantin Valproic acid GTC: GENERALIZED TONIC CLONIC / GRAND MAL /- prodrome Tonic ([learnneurosurgery.com]
Gustatory Hallucination
  • Seizures starting in the uncus may be preceded by olfactory or gustatory hallucinations (uncinate fits 3 ), hence the antiquated term rhinencephalon for its developmental origin.[radiopaedia.org]
  • Environmental and Industrial causes The olfactory hallucinations are associated with aural gustatory hallucinations.[meta-religion.com]
  • Gustatory hallucinations are seldom found as an early sign of cognitive derrangement. One of our veterans, began to complain of having a bad taste in his mouth.[priory.com]
  • Gustatory hallucinations can occur in partial complex crises and in tumors involving the uncus and the parietal operculum and they often occur together with olfactory hallucinations.[arquivosdeorl.org.br]

Workup

  • […] lesion for neoplastic signal Electroencephalography (EEG); indicated in all patients with suspected temporal lobe epilepsy Magnetoencephalography (MEG); mainly used for coregistration with MRI to give magnetic source imaging in 3-dimensional space See Workup[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Kim DW, Lee SK, Yun CH, et al: Parietal lobe epilepsy: the semiology, yield of diagnostic workup, and surgical outcome. Epilepsia 2004;45:641–649.[karger.com]
Seizure Activity
  • Because of the dangers inherent in the surgery, this mode of therapy is reserved for those patients who do not respond to medical management and in whom the focus of seizure activity is accessible.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • activity or two or more sequential seizures without full recovery y* of consciousness between seizures." • Conventional: 10 or more minutes • Practical: Any patient that is still seizing by the time you get to the floor after getting paged, got off the[quizlet.com]

Treatment

  • Part of the Oxford Textbooks in Clinical Neurology (OTCN) series, this volume covers the scientific basis, clinical diagnosis, and treatment of epilepsy and epileptic seizures.[books.google.de]
  • Learn about the cause of these conditions, the pathogenesis, medical diagnosis and treatment, and most importantly, the special implications for the therapist.[books.google.ro]
  • Epilepsy has been known for thousands of years and has been subjected to various forms of conventional and non-conventional therapies including a non-pharmacological conservative treatment known as aromatherapy, ever since.[neurocritic.blogspot.com]
  • If hallucinations are infrequent and transitory, and can be accounted for by short-term environmental factors such as sleep deprivation or meditation, no treatment may be necessary.[meta-religion.com]
  • Data were included for nine adults undergoing deep brain stimulation implantation surgery for chronic treatment-resistant depression. The researchers recorded 72 active and 36 sham trials among the patients.[medicalxpress.com]

Prognosis

  • It has many causes and many forms, and a variable prognosis. Mortality and morbidity are high, social and legal consequences can stretch well beyond the purely medical, and its management is often poor.[books.google.de]
  • […] generalization compared to those who do not; and Apply DTI to assess the potential immediate and long-term neurotoxic effects of seizures upon brain fibres in TLE, with the ultimate aim of contributing significant improvements to the diagnosis, potential prognosis[3tcentre.com]
  • BALTIC MYOCLONUS Epi: Gen: Ar Loc: Purkinje cell MoA: atrophy, myoclonic seizures NON-SEIZURES TOXIC METABOLIC ENCEPHALOPATHY (1/2 HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY) Triphasic waves, sharps 1-2/sec ANOXIC ENCEPHALOPATHY Normal to isoelectric Alpha coma with poor prognosis[learnneurosurgery.com]
  • Polypharmacy, Porencephaly, Porphyria, Positron Emission Tomography Scanning (PET), Postoperative (S), Post-Traumatic (E) , Postural (S) , Pregnancy ,Prevalence, Primary (Generalized Epilepsies) , Primidone (PRM, MysolineÆ*) , Progabide, (GabreneÆ*) , Prognosis[springerpub.com]

Etiology

  • The Etiology of Migraine The exact etiology of the various aspects of migraine is not completely understood. Migraine is certainly familial, but the exact gene or combination of genes is ... Coma : Etiology Diffuse bilateral cerebral lesion.[1pdf.net]
  • Prolonged febrile convulsions, perinatal trauma and hypoxia, craniocerebral trauma or meningoencephalitis can be the specific etiologic condition.[pediatrics.aappublications.org]
  • A careful search was conducted for etiologic factors, and correlation of psychological patterns with electroencephalographic findings was carried out. In addition neurologic deficit, psychometric findings and social adjustment were studied.[pediatrics.aappublications.org]
  • The hallucinatory experience has a wide range of etiologies like neurological insult, seizure and sleep disorders, drug reactions, substance abuse, grief, stress, as well as metabolic, endocrine and infectious diseases.[meta-religion.com]
  • Etiology Hippocampal sclerosis Approximately two thirds of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy treated surgically have hippocampal sclerosis as the pathologic substrate.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Epidemiology

  • Disease), Dyskinesias 7, Dysmnestic (S) , Dysphasic (S), Eclampsia , EEG (Electroencephalography), Elderly, Late-Life Onset (E), Electroconvulsive Therapy , Electrodes, Subdural (Epidural) , Employment , Encephalitis/Encephalitides , Encephalopathies , Epidemiology[springerpub.com]
  • Epidemiology Approximately 50% of patients with epilepsy have partial epilepsy. Partial epilepsy is often of temporal lobe origin.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Rajna P, Clemens B, Csibri E, et al: Hungarian multicentre epidemiologic study of the warning and initial symptoms (prodrome, aura) of epileptic seizures. Seizure 1997;6:361–368.[karger.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Widdess-Walsh P, Kotagal P, Jeha L, Wu G, Burgess R: Multiple auras: clinical significance and pathophysiology. Neurology 2007;69:755–761.[karger.com]

Prevention

  • Seite 118 - ... therapeutic use of self-care, work and play activities to increase independent function, enhance development and prevent disability... ‎ Seite 114 - Levin. HS. High, WM. Goethe, KE, Sisson, RA. Overall, JE, Rhoades, HM.[books.google.com]
  • In addition to addressing specific diseases and conditions, this text emphasizes health promotion and disease prevention strategies and covers issues with implications for physical therapy management, such as injury, inflammation, and healing; the lymphatic[books.google.ro]
  • Published on behalf of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, the journal’s overriding concern is to improve the prevention, investigation, diagnosis, treatment, and care of mental illness, as well as the promotion of mental health globally.[bjp.rcpsych.org]
  • Olfactory areas are in close proximity as well as directly connected to regions where seizures develop in TLE and neuronal activity generated by olfaction can thus prevent the spread of synchronous activity responsible for the epileptic attack.[neurocritic.blogspot.com]
  • […] calcium channels Indication: Generalized absence Adverse effects: Abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, anorexia, rash, movement disorders Mechanism: Blocks T-type voltage gated calcium channels Indication: Focal and generalized epilepsy, migraine prevention[quizlet.com]

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