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Uncinate Seizure


Presentation

  • Although definitions for most terms are readily available on the Internet, the INS Dictionary presents definitions with a neuropsychological perspective with relevance for neuropsychologists more clearly identified.[books.google.com]
  • […] introduced in or shortly before 1879 by the British neurologist John Hughlings Jackson (1835 1911), as a somewhat paradoxical replacement for the term… … Dictionary of Hallucinations hallucinatory epilepsy — A term used to denote a focal type of epilepsy presenting[medicine.academic.ru]
  • ., identified nine out of 347 patients with intracranial aneurysms (2.6%) presenting with epilepsy. [1] We report a 75-year-old lady who presented with uncinate seizures and had a left internal carotid artery (ICA) aneurysm on imaging.[jpgmonline.com]
  • Cho, Kim, Noh, Kim, Lee, and Kim: Nocturnal Frontal Lobe Epilepsy Presenting as Obstructive Type Sleep Apnea Abstract A 20-year-old man presented with sleep apnea. Polysomnography was performed and it revealed nine apneas and two hypopneas.[j-epilepsy.org]
  • Incorporates the Medical Model, the Disablement Model, and the ICF Model Incorporates Preferred Practice Patterns from the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice, Second Edition throughout the text Presents key information in at-a-glance format that is[books.google.ro]
Dysgeusia
  • Dysgeusia can be a direct or indirect effect of malign conditions. Hypergeusia and parageusia can occur in psychoses and in the conversion disorder (32).[arquivosdeorl.org.br]
  • Rossetti AO, Mortati KA, Black PM, Bromfield EB: Simple partial seizures with hemisensory phenomena and dysgeusia: an insular pattern. Epilepsia 2005;46:590–591.[karger.com]
Olfactory Hallucination
  • Olfactory hallucination are caused by temporal seizures (uncinate fits) but may also be caused by schizophrenia or depression can be caused by temporal lobe hamartoma, mesial temporal sclerosis or a glioma mesial temporal sclerosis is associated with[prod.wiki.cns.org]
  • It is used to denote a type of *aura manifesting itself in the form of an * olfactory hallucination or * parosmia (i.e. an olfactory *illusion) … Dictionary of Hallucinations[medicine.academic.ru]
  • Olfactory hallucinations and auras often accompany temporal lobe seizures ( Chen et al., 2003 ; West & Doty, 1995 ).[neurocritic.blogspot.com]
  • Environmental and Industrial causes The olfactory hallucinations are associated with aural gustatory hallucinations.[meta-religion.com]
  • hallucinations) A utomatisms 33% w/ MTS 66% w/ hx GTC If frontal (SMA) - bicycling movements Focal spikes, diffuse rhythmic activity Adolescents Adults Carbamezepine Dilantin Valproic acid GTC: GENERALIZED TONIC CLONIC / GRAND MAL /- prodrome Tonic ([learnneurosurgery.com]
Olfactory Hallucination
  • Olfactory hallucination are caused by temporal seizures (uncinate fits) but may also be caused by schizophrenia or depression can be caused by temporal lobe hamartoma, mesial temporal sclerosis or a glioma mesial temporal sclerosis is associated with[prod.wiki.cns.org]
  • It is used to denote a type of *aura manifesting itself in the form of an * olfactory hallucination or * parosmia (i.e. an olfactory *illusion) … Dictionary of Hallucinations[medicine.academic.ru]
  • Olfactory hallucinations and auras often accompany temporal lobe seizures ( Chen et al., 2003 ; West & Doty, 1995 ).[neurocritic.blogspot.com]
  • Environmental and Industrial causes The olfactory hallucinations are associated with aural gustatory hallucinations.[meta-religion.com]
  • hallucinations) A utomatisms 33% w/ MTS 66% w/ hx GTC If frontal (SMA) - bicycling movements Focal spikes, diffuse rhythmic activity Adolescents Adults Carbamezepine Dilantin Valproic acid GTC: GENERALIZED TONIC CLONIC / GRAND MAL /- prodrome Tonic ([learnneurosurgery.com]
Impulsivity
  • […] temporal lobe epilepsy that originates in the region of the uncus and is characterized by hallucinations of taste and odor and disturbances of consciousness … Medical dictionary Epilepsy — (seizure disorder): When nerve cells in the brain fire electrical impulses[medicine.academic.ru]
  • Seizure spread: Depolarization spreads until surrounding neurons inhibited Sz start in the cortex spread to deep nuceli return to cortex Impulses go to BG, thalamus, and reticular formation where they are amplified (tonic phase- polyspike) Diencephalon[learnneurosurgery.com]
  • White matter is mainly composed of axons of nerve cells, which form connections between various grey matter areas of the brain, and carry nerve impulses between neurons allowing communication between different brain regions.[sciencedaily.com]
  • As the impulses are propagated to the limbic system (as well as to upper cortical areas), some smells and tastes can unleash intense emotional responses of memory flows (1).[arquivosdeorl.org.br]
Gustatory Hallucination
  • Seizures starting in the uncus may be preceded by olfactory or gustatory hallucinations (uncinate fits 3 ), hence the antiquated term rhinencephalon for its developmental origin.[radiopaedia.org]
  • Environmental and Industrial causes The olfactory hallucinations are associated with aural gustatory hallucinations.[meta-religion.com]
  • Gustatory hallucinations are seldom found as an early sign of cognitive derrangement. One of our veterans, began to complain of having a bad taste in his mouth.[priory.com]
  • Gustatory hallucinations can occur in partial complex crises and in tumors involving the uncus and the parietal operculum and they often occur together with olfactory hallucinations.[arquivosdeorl.org.br]
Gustatory Hallucination
  • Seizures starting in the uncus may be preceded by olfactory or gustatory hallucinations (uncinate fits 3 ), hence the antiquated term rhinencephalon for its developmental origin.[radiopaedia.org]
  • Environmental and Industrial causes The olfactory hallucinations are associated with aural gustatory hallucinations.[meta-religion.com]
  • Gustatory hallucinations are seldom found as an early sign of cognitive derrangement. One of our veterans, began to complain of having a bad taste in his mouth.[priory.com]
  • Gustatory hallucinations can occur in partial complex crises and in tumors involving the uncus and the parietal operculum and they often occur together with olfactory hallucinations.[arquivosdeorl.org.br]
Aura
  • In dentistry, the adaptation of any dental restoration, e.g., of an inla … Medical dictionary olfactory aura — The term olfactory aura comes from the Latin words ol(e)facere (to smell) and aura (breeze, smell).[medicine.academic.ru]
  • This is most probably due to the small amount of studies that focus solely on olfactory auras, as those are reported mostly as a single group in series evaluating a broader spectrum of auras 6.[scielo.br]
  • Just before a seizure (the preictal stage) the patient may experience an abnormal somatic, visceral, or psychic sensation called an aura. The presence or absence of the aura and its nature (if it is present) should be noted and recorded.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • Olfactory aura is rare and suggests origin of seizure in the uncus/amygdyla.[jpgmonline.com]
Agitation
  • The person's response to the event must involve intense fear, helplessness, or horror (or in children, the response must involve disorganized or agitated behavior... ‎ 33 ページ - Delis, DC, Kramer, JH, Kaplan, E., and Ober, BA 1987.[books.google.com]
  • […] concentration (not good for school age), depression, parasthesias, renal stones, glaucoma, metabolic acidosis Mechanism: Blocker of sodium channels and high voltage activated calcium channels Indication: Focal and generalized epilepsy Adverse effects: Agitation[quizlet.com]
  • , palpitations, tachycardia), flushing, gastrorintestinal, pallor, piloerection, respiratory Cognitive/psychic – Déjà vu or jamais vu, dissociation, depersonalization or derealization, forced thinking, aphasia/dysphasia, memory Emotional/affective - agitation[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • These include depression, irritability, agitation, and psychosis. AED withdrawal can provoke transient psychiatric symptoms, and therefore AEDs should always be slowly tapered when they are discontinued.[primarypsychiatry.com]
Parosmia
  • It is used to denote a type of *aura manifesting itself in the form of an * olfactory hallucination or * parosmia (i.e. an olfactory *illusion) … Dictionary of Hallucinations[medicine.academic.ru]
  • In temporal lobe epilepsy, amygdalar and hippocampal lesions cause epigastric discomfort and uncinate fits such as autonomic seizures, psychological seizures, and parosmia, while lateral temporal lesions cause auditory hallucinations and language disturbance[f1000research.com]
  • Parosmias are common. Amnesia in the first 24 hours is associated with a permanent anosmia in more than 90% of cases. When smell is partially preserved, a reduction in the distinction of smells has been noticed (17).[arquivosdeorl.org.br]
Parosmia
  • It is used to denote a type of *aura manifesting itself in the form of an * olfactory hallucination or * parosmia (i.e. an olfactory *illusion) … Dictionary of Hallucinations[medicine.academic.ru]
  • In temporal lobe epilepsy, amygdalar and hippocampal lesions cause epigastric discomfort and uncinate fits such as autonomic seizures, psychological seizures, and parosmia, while lateral temporal lesions cause auditory hallucinations and language disturbance[f1000research.com]
  • Parosmias are common. Amnesia in the first 24 hours is associated with a permanent anosmia in more than 90% of cases. When smell is partially preserved, a reduction in the distinction of smells has been noticed (17).[arquivosdeorl.org.br]

Workup

  • […] lesion for neoplastic signal Electroencephalography (EEG); indicated in all patients with suspected temporal lobe epilepsy Magnetoencephalography (MEG); mainly used for coregistration with MRI to give magnetic source imaging in 3-dimensional space See Workup[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • Kim DW, Lee SK, Yun CH, et al: Parietal lobe epilepsy: the semiology, yield of diagnostic workup, and surgical outcome. Epilepsia 2004;45:641–649.[karger.com]

Treatment

  • Chemotherapy treatment for epilepsy, treatment from 2nd seizure is the basic. Chemotherapy effect judgement and period of duration. Selective drug for the case where mental symptom exists.[tokushukai.or.jp]
  • […] patients [ 20, 26 ], and a moderate response rate to DBS for previously treatment-resistant patients [ 16 - 18 ].[karger.com]
  • Learn about the cause of these conditions, the pathogenesis, medical diagnosis and treatment, and most importantly, the special implications for the therapist.[books.google.ro]
  • Data were included for nine adults undergoing deep brain stimulation implantation surgery for chronic treatment-resistant depression. The researchers recorded 72 active and 36 sham trials among the patients.[medicalxpress.com]
  • Article Effect of antidepressant switching between nortriptyline and escitalopram after a failed first antidepressant treatment among patients with major depressive disorder Ole Köhler-Forsberg, Erik Roj Larsen, Henriette N.[bjp.rcpsych.org]

Prognosis

  • […] generalization compared to those who do not; and Apply DTI to assess the potential immediate and long-term neurotoxic effects of seizures upon brain fibres in TLE, with the ultimate aim of contributing significant improvements to the diagnosis, potential prognosis[3tcentre.com]
  • BALTIC MYOCLONUS Epi: Gen: Ar Loc: Purkinje cell MoA: atrophy, myoclonic seizures NON-SEIZURES TOXIC METABOLIC ENCEPHALOPATHY (1/2 HEPATIC ENCEPHALOPATHY) Triphasic waves, sharps 1-2/sec ANOXIC ENCEPHALOPATHY Normal to isoelectric Alpha coma with poor prognosis[learnneurosurgery.com]
  • Photosensitivity, Polypharmacy, Porencephaly, Porphyria, Positron Emission Tomography Scanning (PET), Postoperative (S), Post-Traumatic (E), Postural (S), Pregnancy ,Prevalence, Primary (Generalized Epilepsies), Primidone (PRM, MysolineÆ*), Progabide, (GabreneÆ*), Prognosis[springerpub.com]
  • Prognosis  Variable dependent on:  Rehabilitative resources.  Timing of rehabilitation.  Infrastructure.  Associated disorders / complications  Severity of lesion.[slideshare.net]
  • Prognosis In comparison with the general population, morbidity and mortality are increased in persons with temporal lobe epilepsy, due to increased accidents from the episodes of consciousness loss.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Etiology

  • The Etiology of Migraine The exact etiology of the various aspects of migraine is not completely understood. Migraine is certainly familial, but the exact gene or combination of genes is ... Coma : Etiology Diffuse bilateral cerebral lesion.[1pdf.net]
  • Prolonged febrile convulsions, perinatal trauma and hypoxia, craniocerebral trauma or meningoencephalitis can be the specific etiologic condition.[pediatrics.aappublications.org]
  • The etiology for acute pancreatitis includes gallstones (40%), alcohol abuse (30%-35%), andidiopathic causes (20%).[appliedradiology.com]
  • Etiology Hippocampal sclerosis Approximately two thirds of patients with temporal lobe epilepsy treated surgically have hippocampal sclerosis as the pathologic substrate.[emedicine.medscape.com]

Epidemiology

  • From the epidemiologic studies of Hauser and colleagues, one may extrapolate an incidence of approximately 2 million individuals in the United States who are subject to epilepsy and predict about 44 new cases per 100,000 persons each year.[accessmedicine.mhmedical.com]
  • Dupuytren's (Disease), Dyskinesias 7, Dysmnestic (S), Dysphasic (S), Eclampsia, EEG (Electroencephalography), Elderly, Late-Life Onset (E), Electroconvulsive Therapy, Electrodes, Subdural (Epidural), Employment, Encephalitis/Encephalitides, Encephalopathies, Epidemiology[springerpub.com]
  • ., Clout, M. and Bazzaz, F.A. ( 2000 ) Biotic invasions: causes, epidemiology, global consequences, and control. Ecological Applications 10, 689 – 710. Martin, D. and Britayev, T.A. ( 1998 ) Symbiotic polychaetes: review of known species.[cambridge.org]
  • Epidemiology Approximately 50% of patients with epilepsy have partial epilepsy. Partial epilepsy is often of temporal lobe origin.[emedicine.medscape.com]
  • The CIEN Foundation was created to promote the development of a network of centres that would support, publicise, and coordinate research in all areas of basic, clinical, and epidemiological neurology.[elsevier.es]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • A detailed analysis of the white matter anatomy of the frontal lobe will be essential for future progress in understanding the pathophysiology and treatment of psychiatric diseases.[karger.com]
  • Because MTLE represents a sufficiently distinct pathophysiological entity, the International League Against Epilepsy has concluded that it does represent a specific epilepsy syndrome [ 11 ].[mdpi.com]

Prevention

  • […] of the variance and is somewhat more meaningful because it is expressed in the same units as the raw scores themselves. ‎ 118 ページ - ... therapeutic use of self-care, work and play activities to increase independent function, enhance development and prevent[books.google.com]
  • In addition to addressing specific diseases and conditions, this text emphasizes health promotion and disease prevention strategies and covers issues with implications for physical therapy management, such as injury, inflammation, and healing; the lymphatic[books.google.ro]
  • Published on behalf of the Royal College of Psychiatrists, the journal’s overriding concern is to improve the prevention, investigation, diagnosis, treatment, and care of mental illness, as well as the promotion of mental health globally.[bjp.rcpsych.org]
  • They are a source of vitamin C prevents scurvy. Scurvy is caused by vitamin C deficiency and can be prevented by consuming 10 milligrams of vitamin C a day (6). An early sign of scurvy is fatigue.[nutritiousfruit.com]
  • Olfactory areas are in close proximity as well as directly connected to regions where seizures develop in TLE and neuronal activity generated by olfaction can thus prevent the spread of synchronous activity responsible for the epileptic attack.[neurocritic.blogspot.com]

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