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Unresolved Pneumonia


Presentation

  • Aspirin Use and Respiratory Morbidity in COPD Aspirin Use and Respiratory Morbidity in COPDA Propensity Score-Matched Analysis in Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD StudyPart of this article has been presented at the 2018 ATS International[hkresp.com]
  • Recurrent pneumonia is 2 or more separate episodes of new lower respiratory tract and lung tissue infection presenting with new fever, new leukocytosis, and new purulent phlegm.[consultant360.com]
  • The presentation of lobar pneumonia depends on the severity of the disease, host factors and the presence of complications.[radiopaedia.org]
  • It is known that OP can also present as overlapping interstitial and alveolar opacities.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • If pleurisy (inflammation of the pleura) is present, a friction rub or squeak may be heard. Chest X-ray may help confirm the presence of fluid.[emedicinehealth.com]
Cough
  • One case showed asthma; both, vasomotor rhinitis and cough. 6. Case I showed intervals of recurrence varying from ten months to ten years. 7. Case II showed cough of twenty years standing. 8.[link.springer.com]
  • Fever, chills, night sweats, cough, difficulty breathing, fatigue, and infiltrates on chest radiographs occur with both etiologies.[consultant360.com]
  • -SSX: sx of pneumonia: fever, cough, fatigue, SOB, chest pain, bad breath -in severe cases may become dehydrated or cough up bloody sputum and have very high fever then slip into coma free air or gas in the pleural cavity entering through perforation[quizlet.com]
  • This can lead to symptoms of pneumonia, which include cough or productive cough with mucus, chest pain, fever or chills, fatigue, aches, and trouble breathing.[wisegeek.com]
Sputum Production
  • production, purulent sputum -PE: afebrile, low grade fever, wheezing-bronchospasm, rhonchi-upper airways that clears with cough, normal percussion no changes in voice tests lab: no to mild leukocytosis -imaging: CXR only if signs of pneumonia (above[quizlet.com]
Labored Breathing
  • Went into my Dr. and she did a chest xray after doing a breathing treatment with no improvement to my painful labored breathing.[ehealthforum.com]
Forgetful
  • It is a very dangerous pitfall to treat and forget about patients with acute pneumonia once antibiotics have been initiated.[consultant360.com]

Workup

  • […] acute pulmonary: crackles or wheezes, pericardial friction rub, erythema multiforme or nodosum 2. chronic pulmonary: crackles and wheezes 3. chronic progressive disseminated histoplasmosis: mouth ulcers, eyes may have vision loss, hepatosplenomegaly WORKUP[quizlet.com]
Pulmonary Infiltrate
  • B-Symptoms and pulmonary infiltrate were improved immediately by a therapy with steroids.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia with migratory pulmonary infiltrates. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1992; 158 (3):515–517. doi: 10.2214/ajr.158.3.1738986. [ PubMed ] [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ] 17. Colby TV, Myers JL.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • treatment of CAP, along with specific patient characteristics, can portend complications from continuing pneumonia despite appropriate antibiotic treatment, including parapneumonic effusions, empyema, and lung abscess, leading to unresolved acute pneumonia[consultant360.com]
  • Went into my Dr. and she did a chest xray after doing a breathing treatment with no improvement to my painful labored breathing.[ehealthforum.com]
  • Your physician will continue to monitor you after treatment is concluded to ensure that you remain healthy.[brighamandwomens.org]
  • , respiratory rate, blood pressure, and pulse Home treatment If you can safely get treatment for pneumonia at home, your doctor may prescribe antibiotics.[healthline.com]
  • Treatment of Pneumonia Recurrent Pneumonia in Children Type of treatment depends on the cause of pneumonia, severity of infection and age of child. Medication, both prescription and over the counter, is typically the most effective treatment.[pedilung.com]

Prognosis

  • […] high fever, tachycardia or bradycardia, bronchial breath sounds, dullness to percussion, pallor -Work up: CXR, CMP, CBC, CT, bronchoscopy -prognosis: normal resolution of sx vary but most people see improvements in 3-5 days of treatment, if unresolved[quizlet.com]
  • Treatment and prognosis Radiological follow-up of lobar pneumonia is often recommended - one study found 5% of initially suspected community-acquired pneumonia were re-diagnosed with malignant or important benign pulmonary pathology on follow-up chest[radiopaedia.org]
  • Causes, symptoms, treatment, preventive measures, and prognosis differ depending on whether the infection is bacterial, mycobacterial, viral, fungal, or parasitic; whether it is acquired in the community or hospital; whether it occurs in a patient treated[msdmanuals.com]
  • Pleural Effusion Prognosis Since a pleural effusion is a symptom of another disease, the prognosis depends upon the underlying illness. Pleural effusions are never normal.[emedicinehealth.com]
  • Features and prognosis of cryptogenic, secondary, and focal variants. Arch Intern Med. 1997; 157 (12):1323–1329. doi: 10.1001/archinte.1997.00440330057006. [ PubMed ] [ CrossRef ] [ Google Scholar ] 6.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Etiology

  • Certain conditions have both an underlying etiology and multiple body system manifestations due to the underlying etiology.[icd10coded.com]
  • -sex, ages -primary infection ETIOLOGY -transmission occurs person to person by inhaled respiratory droplets.[quizlet.com]
  • Fever, chills, night sweats, cough, difficulty breathing, fatigue, and infiltrates on chest radiographs occur with both etiologies.[consultant360.com]

Epidemiology

  • […] third-generation cephalosporin (ceftriaxone), plus azithromycin or levofloxacin, with or without vancomycin (if methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection is suspected), but the selection of empiric antibiotic treatment should always conform to the epidemiology[consultant360.com]
  • Epidemiology, pathogenesis, and microbiology of community-acquired pneumonia in adults. In: UpToDate. Bond S, editor. Waltam MA; 2017 [cited 2017 Dec 1]. Available from: [ Links ] 37 Musher DM, Thorner AR. Community-Acquired Pneumonia.[scielo.br]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • The most frequent reason for failure to respond to treatment in CAP is the progression of pathophysiologic changes despite appropriate antibiotic treatment. 6 When a patient is failing to recover in the expected time period from the original acute pneumonia[consultant360.com]

Prevention

  • Preventing pneumonia is always better than treating it. Vaccines are available to prevent pneumococcal pneumonia and the flu. Other preventive measures include washing your hands frequently and not smoking.[icdlist.com]
  • Pleural Effusion Prevention Pleural effusions are caused by a variety of conditions and illnesses. Preventing the underlying cause will decrease the potential of developing an effusion.[emedicinehealth.com]
  • Nonspecific lower airway defenses, including cough and mucociliary clearance, prevent infection in airspaces.[msdmanuals.com]
  • Hospital for Sick Children Health A-Z Search a complete list of child health articles expand_more View All Drug A-Z Search a list of articles about medications expand_more View All Learning Hubs Browse a complete list of content groups Healthy Living & Prevention[aboutkidshealth.ca]
  • Here are five things you can do to help prevent pneumonia: Get a flu vaccine The flu is a common cause of pneumonia. Getting a vaccine helps you prevent both the flu and a possible pneumonia infection.[healthline.com]

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