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Versive Seizure


Presentation

  • Herein, we present the first case of VGPN that had ipsilateral hemifacial spasm and versive seizure-like movement to the same side of facial pain.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Here we describe a 67-year-old woman with hypertension who presented with a tonic movement mimicking a versive seizure in the acute phase of bilateral pontine ischemia. Post-stroke movement disorders are well known.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Later that day, the hemiparesis recovered, her dysarthriawas still present and her alertness was normal. One hour afterleft-sided hemiplegia briskly developed (NIHSS score, 11).[docslide.com.br]
Hypersomnia
  • The editors and contributing authors are internationally recognized authorities who cover everything from sleep and ADHD, headaches, restless leg syndrome, parasomnias, hypersomnias, autism, brain tumors, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, and other primary[books.google.com]
  • الصفحة 469 - ... insomnia or hypersomnia; psychomotor agitation or retardation; fatigue or loss of energy; feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt; diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness; and recurrent thoughts[books.google.com]
Restless Legs Syndrome
  • The editors and contributing authors are internationally recognized authorities who cover everything from sleep and ADHD, headaches, restless leg syndrome, parasomnias, hypersomnias, autism, brain tumors, epilepsy, traumatic brain injury, and other primary[books.google.com]
Indecisiveness
  • الصفحة 469 - ... insomnia or hypersomnia; psychomotor agitation or retardation; fatigue or loss of energy; feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt; diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness; and recurrent thoughts[books.google.com]
Feeling of Worthlessness
  • الصفحة 469 - ... insomnia or hypersomnia; psychomotor agitation or retardation; fatigue or loss of energy; feelings of worthlessness or excessive or inappropriate guilt; diminished ability to think or concentrate, or indecisiveness; and recurrent thoughts[books.google.com]
Facial Pain
  • Herein, we present the first case of VGPN that had ipsilateral hemifacial spasm and versive seizure-like movement to the same side of facial pain.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Focal Seizure
  • In summary, the importance of correctly recognizing focal seizures cannot be overstated. Clinical features alone cannot always allow one to diagnose a focal seizure correctly. Rather, “focal seizure” is actually an electroclinical diagnosis.[clinicalgate.com]
  • Focal seizure may generalize into a full blown grand mal attack.[doctorstrizhak.com]
  • […] in focal seizures, localizing characteristics.[slideplayer.com]
  • Other names Versive Seizure; Tonic Seizures, Focal; Tonic Seizure, Focal; Seizures, Versive; Seizure, Versive; Seizure, Focal Clonic; Seizure Disorders, Motor; Seizure Disorders, Hemimotor; Motor Seizure Disorders; Motor Epilepsy, Focal; Hemimotor Seizure[reference.md]
  • Focal seizures as a manifestation of hyperglycemia without ketoacidosis. A report of seven cases with review of the literature. Neurology 1965;15:195–206. 5. Cochin JP, Hannequin D, Delangre T, Guegan-Massardier E, Augustin P.[synapse.koreamed.org]
Dysarthria
  • Author information 1 Département des Neurosciences Cliniques, Service de Neurologie, CHUV-UNIL, 1011-Lausanne, Switzerland. [email protected] Abstract Pontine ischemia usually results in focal deficits such as hemiparesis, facial palsy, dysarthria[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Alvarez).A 67-year-old woman with hypertension came to our hospitalbecause of an acute right-sided hemiparesis, dysarthria and a gazedrift to the right (National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale [NIHSS]score of 9).[documents.tips]
  • Focal motor seizure with dysarthria / anarthria - the onset of the seizure is characterized by difficulty with articulation of speech, due to impaired coordination of muscles involved in speech sound production.[epilepsydiagnosis.org]
Chorea
  • Chorea, dystonia, tremor,parkinsonism, stereotypia, jerky dystonic unsteady hand, aster-ixis, jaw myoclonus and hemiakathisia were described.[documents.tips]
  • Chorea-ballism associated with nonketotic hyperglycaemia or diabetic ketoacidosis: characteristics of 25 patients in Korea. Diabetes Res Clin Pract 2011;93:e80–e83. 7. Lavin PJ.[synapse.koreamed.org]
Neuralgia
  • Abstract Vagoglossopharyngeal neuralgia (VGPN) is a very rare condition. VGPN with convulsive like attack is even rarer All of the cases had their head turned to the opposite side of facial pain.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • J Med Assoc Thai 2016 Jan;99(1):106-10 Vagoglossopharyngeal neuralgia (VGPN) is a very rare condition. VGPN with convulsive like attack is even rarer All of the cases had their head turned to the opposite side of facial pain.[pubfacts.com]
Rubral Tremor
  • The lesionsthat induced movement disorders were all located above the cere-bellar tentorium (either in the basal ganglia, the thalamus or thecortex), except for two patients with dystonia and a contralateralpontine lesion, one patient with rubral tremor[documents.tips]

Workup

  • Epilepsy A single epilepsy seizure does not constitute a diagnosis of epilepsy, but recognizing a seizure is the first step in the workup for a possible diagnosis of epilepsy.[doctortipster.com]
  • Combining advanced neuroimaging techniques in presurgical workup of non-lesional intractable epilepsy. Epileptic Disord 2006 ; 8 : 190 –4. 35. Najm IM, Naugle R, Busch RM, et al.[cambridge.org]
Seizure Activity
  • Focal Seizures These terms reflect the extent of brain involvement in the seizure activity. In focal seizure, only a part of the body is involved. Generalized seizures spread to both sides during seizure activity.[doctorstrizhak.com]
  • Propagation of seizure activity to mesiotemporal limbic structures is frequent and accompanied by automatisms typical of temporal lobe epilepsy.[epilepsyontario.org]
  • (B) Propagation of seizure activity from the mesial temporal lobe to the ipsilateral lateral temporal lobe and the contralateral temporal lobe. (C) Spread of seizure activity from bilateral temporal lobes to midline subcortical structures.[slideplayer.com]
  • Partial Motor Seizures Seizure activity originating in one side of the brain is manifested in the opposite side of the face, limbs, or trunk. There may be rhythmical jerking or persistent spasm of the affected part.[healthhype.com]
Sinus Arrest
  • Electrocardiography showed sinus arrest. Interictal Electroencephalography was normal. This patient initially responded to pregabalin for two weeks, then the symptoms became worse.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]

Treatment

  • .): Surgical Treatment of the Epilepsies. 2nd ed. New York, Raven Press 1993, s. ‏[books.google.com]
  • Sleep in Childhood Neurological Disorders features Dedicated focus on neurologically-based sleep disorders in children Diagnostic tables, key points, clinical pearls, and treatment algorithms throughout to enhance clinical utility Directions for "Future[books.google.com]
  • Based on their extensive clinical experience, the authors provide a personal perspective on diagnosis and treatment.[books.google.com]
  • Rule out for phencyclidine addiction or craving in case patient may simulate signs of EPS to receive procyclidine Diagnosis [ edit ] Largely clinical Treatment [ edit ] Immediate treatment of drug induced OGC can be achieved with intravenous antimuscarinic[en.wikipedia.org]
  • It is important to start treatment right away. There is no cure for epilepsy, but medicines can control seizures for most people. When medicines are not working well, surgery or implanted devices such as vagus nerve stimulators may help.[icdlist.com]

Prognosis

  • Epilepsy with myoclonic astatic seizures Although in this form of epilepsy, a PPR is often found during childhood, little is known about its clinical correlates and prognosis.[epilepsyontario.org]
  • :Good prognosis of mid-temporal epilepsy. Epilepsia, 1: 448-453, 1960. 23) Gomez, M. (ed) :Tuberous sclerosis. Raven Press, New York, 1979. 24) Gumnit, R. J. :The epilepsy handbook -The practical management of seizures.[molcom.jp]
  • An epilepsy syndrome diagnosis is preferred for assessing prognosis and treatment.[clinicalgate.com]

Etiology

  • In this article, the authors explain the clinical, electrophysiological, and etiological characteristics of this epilepsy syndrome.[medlink.com]
  • The usual etiology for EPC is a lesion involving the sensorimotor cortex resulting from stroke, tumor, trauma, metastasis, or hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy. 98, 119 EPC is frequently seen in the setting of Rasmussen encephalitis, in the subacute type[neupsykey.com]
  • The scheme consists of 5 Axis: Axis 1. description of ictal semiology Axis 2. seizure type as a diagnostic entity Axis 3. syndrome diagnosis Axis 4. etiology Axis 5. impairment 6 Axis 1 – description of ictal semiology Glossary of Descriptive Ictal Terminology[slideplayer.com]
  • Interictal regional polyspikes in noninvasive EEG suggest cortical dysplasia as etiology of focal epilepsies. Epilepsia 2008 ; 49 : 1011 –17. 8. Beleza P, Bilgin O, Noachtar S.[cambridge.org]

Epidemiology

  • In one large epidemiologic study, only 4 of 613 children with epilepsy had a brain tumor [ Berg et al., 2000a ].[clinicalgate.com]
  • In this classification, terms such as focal clonic, focal tonic, or versive are used, and evolution during the course of the seizure is indicated by arrows, for example somatosensory aura left arm clonic seizure left versive seizure. 8, 81, 82 Epidemiology[neupsykey.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • We could not explain the pathophysiology of unilateral versive seizure like movement.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • We could not explain the pathophysiology of unilateral versive seizure like movement. Download full-text PDF Source Still can't find the full text of the article? We can help you send a request to the authors directly.[pubfacts.com]
  • Pathophysiology: depends on the underlying seizure type, and usually result from a generalized seizure disorder. 15 Absence seizure Episodes of unresponsiveness or decreased responsiveness not explained by motor or speech alterations.[slideplayer.com]
  • Neck atonia with a focal stimulation-induced seizure arising from the SMA: pathophysiological considerations. Epilepsy Behav 2012 ; 24 : 503 –6. 58. Sun YP, Zhu HW, Zhang SW, et al.[cambridge.org]
  • Denmark, Wagner found that 17% of epileptic patients had simple partial seizures. 124 Loiseau reported that out of 200 patients with partial seizures, 71 (35.5%) had partial motor symptoms, of whom 10 patients exhibited a march. 76 Anatomic Pathways and Pathophysiology[neupsykey.com]

Prevention

  • Treatment of Seizure The main aim of treatment is to prevent recurrence. Determining the cause of the seizure and treatment of causes such as infection or injury can prevent recurrence.[healthhype.com]
  • In other words, the goal of all of the contributors is to provide us with at least some of the knowledge that we will need to anticipate and prevent future such tragic episodes.[books.google.ro]
  • Increa… avoidance theory of punishment conditioned suppression theory of punis… exposure and response prevention (ERP) extrinsic punishment the theory that punishment involves a type of avoidance condit… the theory that punishment does not weaken a behavior[quizlet.com]
  • That has prompted some critics of this legislation to argue that it would not have prevented the rampage that inspired it.[thetruthaboutguns.com]
  • Trump, Inauguration Day Address, 1/20/2017 But there are NO laws on the books today in the USA—land of the free and home of the brave—to prevent non-consensual experimentation on humans.[everydayconcerned.net]

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