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Western Equine Encephalomyelitis

Western Equine Encephalitis


Presentation

  • DOI: 10.1084/jem.101.2.205 Published February 1, 1955 Abstract Experiments are presented in which the plaque assay technique was used to study the intracellular appearance and release of Western equine encephalomyelitis virus in suspensions of infected[jem.rupress.org]
  • Infection in males is primarily due to working conditions and sports activity taking place where the vector is present.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
Fever
  • Symptoms of illness begin with the sudden onset of high fever, chills, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Severe illness includes encephalitis, seizures, and coma. Arboviral diseases home Last Revised: July 27, 2018[dhs.wisconsin.gov]
  • Since cross-reactivity with dengue fever virus does occur with St. Louis encephalitis antigens and, therefore, cannot be differentiated further.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
  • Most severe human cases begin with a sudden onset of fever, headache, stiff neck, vomiting, or weakness. The illness may progress to disorientation, irritability, seizures and coma.[health.state.mn.us]
  • […] nervous system A83 ICD-10-CM Diagnosis Code A83 Mosquito-borne viral encephalitis 2016 2017 2018 2019 Non-Billable/Non-Specific Code Includes mosquito-borne viral meningoencephalitis Type 2 Excludes Venezuelan equine encephalitis ( A92.2 ) West Nile fever[icd10data.com]
  • […] dystonia syndrome Brain dopamine-serotonin vesicular transport disease Carbon monoxide-induced parkinsonism Chronic encephalitis Cirrhosis-dystonia-polycythemia-hypermanganesemia syndrome Classic progressive supranuclear palsy syndrome Colorado tick fever[se-atlas.de]
High Fever
  • Symptoms of illness begin with the sudden onset of high fever, chills, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Severe illness includes encephalitis, seizures, and coma. Arboviral diseases home Last Revised: July 27, 2018[dhs.wisconsin.gov]
Chills
  • Symptoms of illness begin with the sudden onset of high fever, chills, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Severe illness includes encephalitis, seizures, and coma. Arboviral diseases home Last Revised: July 27, 2018[dhs.wisconsin.gov]
Malaise
  • The disease usually begins suddenly with malaise, fever, and headache, often with nausea and vomiting. Vertigo, photophobia, sore throat, respiratory symptoms, abdominal pain, and myalgia are also common.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
Fatigue
  • After recovery from acute disease, patients may require from several months to 2 years to overcome the fatigue, headache, and irritability. Infants and children are at higher risk of permanent brain damage after recovery than adults.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
Vomiting
  • Symptoms of illness begin with the sudden onset of high fever, chills, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Severe illness includes encephalitis, seizures, and coma. Arboviral diseases home Last Revised: July 27, 2018[dhs.wisconsin.gov]
  • Most severe human cases begin with a sudden onset of fever, headache, stiff neck, vomiting, or weakness. The illness may progress to disorientation, irritability, seizures and coma.[health.state.mn.us]
  • The disease usually begins suddenly with malaise, fever, and headache, often with nausea and vomiting. Vertigo, photophobia, sore throat, respiratory symptoms, abdominal pain, and myalgia are also common.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
Nausea
  • Symptoms of illness begin with the sudden onset of high fever, chills, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Severe illness includes encephalitis, seizures, and coma. Arboviral diseases home Last Revised: July 27, 2018[dhs.wisconsin.gov]
  • The disease usually begins suddenly with malaise, fever, and headache, often with nausea and vomiting. Vertigo, photophobia, sore throat, respiratory symptoms, abdominal pain, and myalgia are also common.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
Photophobia
  • Vertigo, photophobia, sore throat, respiratory symptoms, abdominal pain, and myalgia are also common. Over a few days, the headache intensifies; drowsiness and restlessness may merge into a coma in severe cases.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
Headache
  • Over a few days, the headache intensifies; drowsiness and restlessness may merge into a coma in severe cases. In infants and children, the onset may be more abrupt than for adults.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
  • Symptoms of illness begin with the sudden onset of high fever, chills, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Severe illness includes encephalitis, seizures, and coma. Arboviral diseases home Last Revised: July 27, 2018[dhs.wisconsin.gov]
  • Clinical manifestations include headache and influenza-like symptoms followed by alterations in mentation, seizures, and coma. Death occurs in a minority of cases.[icd10data.com]
  • Most severe human cases begin with a sudden onset of fever, headache, stiff neck, vomiting, or weakness. The illness may progress to disorientation, irritability, seizures and coma.[health.state.mn.us]
Seizure
  • Severe illness includes encephalitis, seizures, and coma. Arboviral diseases home Last Revised: July 27, 2018[dhs.wisconsin.gov]
  • Clinical manifestations include headache and influenza-like symptoms followed by alterations in mentation, seizures, and coma. Death occurs in a minority of cases.[icd10data.com]
  • The illness may progress to disorientation, irritability, seizures and coma. Approximately 5-15% of these encephalitis cases are fatal, and about 50% of surviving infants will have permanent brain damage.[health.state.mn.us]
Aura
  • In contrast, the Old World members of the WEE complex, as well as Aura virus, did not appear to have recombinant genomes.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Three epizootic WEE virus strains (McMillan, Cba 87, and Cba CIV 180) and five enzootic WEE complex viruses (Highlands J [HJ], Y62-33, Aura, Fort Morgan [FM], and WEE AG80-646) were examined.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
Irritability
  • The illness may progress to disorientation, irritability, seizures and coma. Approximately 5-15% of these encephalitis cases are fatal, and about 50% of surviving infants will have permanent brain damage.[health.state.mn.us]
  • After recovery from acute disease, patients may require from several months to 2 years to overcome the fatigue, headache, and irritability. Infants and children are at higher risk of permanent brain damage after recovery than adults.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
Rabies
  • A82.9 Rabies, unspecified A83 Mosquito-borne viral encephalitis A83.0 Japanese encephalitis A83.1 Western equine encephalitis A83.2 Eastern equine encephalitis A83.3 St Louis encephalitis A83.4 Australian encephalitis A83.5 California encephalitis A83.6[icd10data.com]
  • Progressive supranuclear palsy-corticobasal syndrome Progressive supranuclear palsy-parkinsonism syndrome Progressive supranuclear palsy-progressive non-fluent aphasia syndrome Progressive supranuclear palsy-pure akinesia with gait freezing syndrome Rabies[se-atlas.de]

Treatment

  • Ideal for both practitioners and students, this comprehensive resource covers the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of infectious disease in horses.[books.google.com]
  • By GRETCHEN REYNOLDS Photo Credit Getty Images You asked How to Stop a Hot Flash Effective treatments are available to stop the discomfort of menopause symptoms.[nytimes.com]

Etiology

  • Donat JF, Hable-Rhodes KH, Groover RV, Smith TF: Etiology and outcome in 42 children with acute nonbacterial meningoencephalitis. Mayo Clin Proc 1980;55:156-160 3. Tsai TF: Arboviruses. In Manual of Clinical Microbiology. 7th edition.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]

Epidemiology

  • Abstract A simple model is used to explore the extent to which the uniquely comprehensive studies of western equine encephalomyelitis in Kern County, California, by Reeves and his colleagues over many years, explain the dynamics and epidemiology of the[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • Adult mice inoculated intraperitoneally showed differential responses that corresponded to the epidemiologic attributes of WEE viruses.[ncbi.nlm.nih.gov]
  • It also addresses the importance of preventing and controlling infectious disease outbreaks with coverage of epidemiology, biosecurity, antimicrobial therapy, and recognizing foreign equine diseases.[books.google.com]
  • The specific virus responsible for such a titer may be deduced by the travel history of the patient, along with available medical and epidemiological data, unless the virus can be isolated.[mayomedicallaboratories.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • Fishman, Turino, and Bergofsky reviewed the clinical, pathophysiological, and biochemical features of the syndrome and many of the disease processes with which it may be associated (1).[annals.org]
  • Clinical Information Discusses physiology, pathophysiology, and general clinical aspects, as they relate to a laboratory test The virus that causes Western equine encephalitis (WEE) is widely distributed throughout the United States and Canada; disease[mayomedicallaboratories.com]

Prevention

  • Ideal for both practitioners and students, this comprehensive resource covers the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of infectious disease in horses.[books.google.com]
  • Footnotes 1 This study was carried out under the Commission on Neurotropic Virus Diseases, Board for the Investigation and Control of Influenza and Other Epidemic Diseases in the Army, Preventive Medicine Service, Office of the Surgeon General, United[jimmunol.org]

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