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X-Linked Mandibulofacial Dysostosis

Mandibulofacial Dysostosis Type Toriello


Presentation

  • Coarctation and/or hypoplasia of the thoracic aorta along with aortic valve anomalies are sometimes present. Intracranial and intraspinal lipomas are present in over 60% of individuals.[disorders.eyes.arizona.edu]
  • Presentation on theme: "A Review of Pediatric Syndromes"— Presentation transcript: 1 A Review of Pediatric Syndromes Jamie Tibbo, PGY-5 Department of Otolaryngology July 25, 2008 2 CHARGE Syndrome Autosomal Dominant Due to a mutation in DNA-binding protein[slideplayer.com]
  • When present as an isolated anomaly, it is usually inherited as an autosomal dominant form. In some families it runs as X linked as well as Autosomal recessive patterns.[dailyrounds.org]
  • Upper limb malformation is a constant feature of Nager syndrome More Details and ranges from thumb hypoplasia to absence of the radial ray. [3] We present an interesting case of Nager syndrome presenting with not only craniofacial and upper limb defects[jofs.in]
  • A review of the past medical history of affected family members did not show any associated medical problems that were present in every affected subject.[jmg.bmj.com]
Dysostosis
  • General Task: Retrieve concepts related to X-linked mandibulofacial dysostosis (disorder) using its definition. Select the defining relationship of X-linked mandibulofacial dysostosis (disorder) you'd like to use for this demo.[vtsl.vetmed.vt.edu]
  • MalaCards based summary : Branchial Arch Syndrome, X-Linked, also known as mandibulofacial dysostosis, toriello type, is related to dysostosis. Affiliated tissues include bone, and related phenotypes are high palate and microcephaly[malacards.org]
  • Acrofacial dysostosis, Nager type 0 *Mandibulofacial Dysostosis. Acrofacial dysostosis Rodriguez type 0 *Hand Deformities, Congenital *Mandibulofacial Dysostosis.[reference.md]
  • Synonyms of Maxillofacial Dysostosis autosomal dominant maxillofacial dysostosis General Discussion Maxillofacial dysostosis is an extremely rare genetic disorder characterized by distinctive abnormalities of the head and face (craniofacial) area.[rarediseases.org]
Short Stature
  • stature, bilateral hearing loss, and learning disability.[malacards.org]
  • Fistula (Mmt) Syndrome Microcephaly-Mild Developmental Delay-Short Stature-Distinctive Face Syndrome Microcephaly-Mild Mental Retardation-Short Stature-Skeletal Anomalies Syndrome Microcephaly-Muscular Build-Rhizomelia-Cataracts Syndrome Microcephaly-Oculo-Digito-Esophageal-Duodenal[neo-genetics.com]
  • stature syndrome Short stature, microcephaly, and endocrine dysfunction Short stature, optic nerve atrophy, and Pelger-Huet anomaly SHORT syndrome Short-rib thoracic dysplasia Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome Silver-Russell syndrome Skeletal abnormalities[qlinics.com]
  • Moderate Short Stature, Facial, /- Genital Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome Kabuki Syndrome Williams Syndrome Noonan Syndrome Costello Syndrome Cardio-Facio-Cutaneous Syndrome Aarskog Syndrome Robinow Syndrome Opitz G/BBB Syndrome Floating-Harbor Syndrome E[bookdepository.com]
  • stature Facial Features: Triangular face, hypertelorism, down-slanting eyes, ptosis, strabismus (48%), amblyopia (33%), refractive errors (61%), low-set ears with thickened helices, high nasal bridge, short webbed neck.[slideplayer.com]
Inflammation
  • Neonatal onset multisystem inflammatory disease (NOMID) is a rare disorder that causes inflammation and tissue damage primarily affecting the nervous system, skin, and joints.[checkrare.com]
  • […] manifestations, peripheral neuropathy, dementia, subacute combined degeneration, diarrhea, macrocytosis on hematological test. 1.7% to 3.6% 1/200,000 in US high in Norway, Finland Neutropenia ELANE, HAX1, VPS45 Recurrent fever, skin and oropharyngeal inflammation[centogene.com]
Multiple Congenital Anomalies
  • congenital anomalies-hypotonia-seizures syndrome type 1 Multiple joint dislocations, short stature, craniofacial dysmorphism, and congenital heart defects Myhre syndrome Native American myopathy Neuroaxonal neurodegeneration, infantile, with facial dysmophism[qlinics.com]
Physician
  • Affected individuals or parents of affected children should talk to their physicians and medical team about their specific case and associated symptoms.[rarediseases.org]
Malocclusion
  • Section on children from conception to age three covers conditions such as cleft palate, disturbances in calcification, unusual numbers of teeth, oral habits, caries, and the development of malocclusions that start during these years.[books.google.com]
  • (B) Subject V.4 with bilateral ptosis, malar hypoplasia, and malocclusion. (C) Subject V.3 with mild facial asymmetry on the left and malocclusion. (D) Subject V.3 with unilateral anotia with a rudimentary ear and micrognathia.[jmg.bmj.com]
  • […] counselling – for the individual or the whole family, depending on whether the condition was inherited or not hearing aids – usually helpful in the case of conductive hearing loss dental work – including orthodontic work to help correct the child’s malocclusion[betterhealth.vic.gov.au]
  • Lateral cephalogram tracing [Figure 4] revealed severe skeletal class II malocclusion with normodivergent growth pattern, tending toward hyperdivergence.[jofs.in]
  • […] ears, Receding chin, Mouth appears fishlike, Patients are deaf because of a lack of otic ossicles (ear bones), These patients have a hypoplastic mandible with flattened condyles, coronoid processes, and an obtuse mandibular angle, Teeth are malposed, Malocclusion[quizlet.com]
High Arched Palate
  • arched palate Click here to view The maxillofacial skeleton was examined radiographically.[jofs.in]
  • palate high-with increased prevalence of cleft palate 3 4.[slideshare.net]
  • The premaxilla is generally underdeveloped, resulting in pseudoprognathism, High arched palate with an increased occurrence of clefting, Patients have many supernumerary teeth, which are crowded in the jaws and do not erupt, The supernumerary teeth have[quizlet.com]
Skeletal Dysplasia
  • dysplasia Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome Growth hormone insensitivity Growth retardation with deafness and mental retardation due to IGF1 deficiency Guttmacher syndrome Hamamy syndrome Hand-foot-uterus syndrome Hartsfield syndrome Heart-hand syndrome[qlinics.com]
  • Very Small Stature, Not Skeletal Dysplasia Brachmann-de Lange Syndrome Rubinstein-Taybi Syndrome Russell-Silver Syndrome SHORT Syndrome 3-M Syndrome Mulibrey Nanism Syndrome Dubowitz Syndrome Bloom Syndrome Johanson-Blizzard Syndrome Microcephalic Primordial[bookdepository.com]
  • Contractures-Low Fingertip Arches Syndrome Mental Retardation-Distal Arthrogryposis Syndrome Mental Retardation-Dysmorphism-Cerebral Atrophy Syndrome Mental Retardation-Dystonic Movements-Ataxia-Seizures Syndrome Mental Retardation-Epilepsy-Short Stature-Skeletal[neo-genetics.com]
  • dysplasias, muscular hypotonia Waardenburg-Shah (Type IV): phenotype similar to WS2 plus Hirschprung megacolon; AR 26 Waardenberg Syndrome Type I: Dystopia canthorum present; this condition is 20 times more common than type II.[slideplayer.com]
Fracture
  • […] have been reported to decrease frequency of fractures and pain, The main option for control of bone fractures include: Surgery, Physical therapy, Rehabilitation Osteogenesis Imperfecta: Severe cases In the most severe cases all bones can be affected[quizlet.com]
Ulcer
  • Chapter on the diagnosis of oral lesions and developmental anomalies uses tables and extensive illustrations to depict developmental anomalies, white soft tissue lesions and enlargements, dark soft tissue lesions, ulcerative lesions, radiolucent lesions[books.google.com]
  • […] gingivitis, Gingivostomatitis, Ulcerations on tongue and oral mucosa, Repeated episodes lead to severe periodontal disease Papillon-Lefèvre Syndrome An autosomal recessive inheritance pattern, Peripheral blood neutrophils are depressed, and the theory[quizlet.com]
  • The same subject had a history of gastric ulcer and sinus tachycardia; two dimensional echocardiogram was normal.[jmg.bmj.com]
Hearing Impairment
  • impairment from EAC and/or middle ear malformations Preauricular fistulas, mandibular and malar hypoplasia, antimongoloid palpebral fissures, coloboma of the lower eyelids, may have cleft lip and palate, normal IQ 6 Treacher-Collins Syndrome (Mandibulofacial[slideplayer.com]
  • Impairment-Distinct Facies-Skeletal Anomalies Syndrome Mental Retardation-Macroorchidism Syndrome Mental Retardation-Microcephaly-Blepharochalasis Syndrome Mental Retardation-Mitral Valve Prolapse-Characteristic Face Syndrome Mental Retardation-Overgrowth[neo-genetics.com]
Hearing Impairment
  • impairment from EAC and/or middle ear malformations Preauricular fistulas, mandibular and malar hypoplasia, antimongoloid palpebral fissures, coloboma of the lower eyelids, may have cleft lip and palate, normal IQ 6 Treacher-Collins Syndrome (Mandibulofacial[slideplayer.com]
  • Impairment-Distinct Facies-Skeletal Anomalies Syndrome Mental Retardation-Macroorchidism Syndrome Mental Retardation-Microcephaly-Blepharochalasis Syndrome Mental Retardation-Mitral Valve Prolapse-Characteristic Face Syndrome Mental Retardation-Overgrowth[neo-genetics.com]
Beak Nose
  • From Dorland's, 2000. craniofacial dysostosis an autosomal dominant condition marked by a pointed or conical skull, protruding wide-set eyes, strabismus, parrot-beaked nose, and hypoplastic maxilla with relative mandibular prognathism.[medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com]
  • nose, short upper lip, hypoplastic maxilla, relative mandibular prognathism, shallow orbit Jackson-Weiss syndrome 123150 AD craniosynostosis, midfacial hypoplasia Apert syndrome 101200 AD craniosynostosis, brachysphenocephalic acrocephaly, flat facies[widesmiles2.org]
  • nose, possible Choanal Atresia Syndactyly and cervical fusion 9 Apert (acrocephalosyndactyly) Figure 99.4 Apert syndrome has the additional feature of syndactyly.[slideplayer.com]
Broad Nasal Bridge
  • nasal bridge, bulbous tip of the nose, large mouth with thin upper lip, long philtrum, prominent earlobes SEC Sonic hedgehog SHH 7q36 600725 Holoprosencephaly, type 3 142945 AD cyclopia, ocular hypotelorism, proboscis, midface hypoplasia, single nostril[widesmiles2.org]

Treatment

  • Other chapters explore the examination, treatment planning, radiographic concerns, prevention, trauma, restorative dentistry, pulp therapy, orthodontics, and behavior management of each age range.[books.google.com]
  • Treatment Treatment Options: Dental surveillance and treatment are important.[disorders.eyes.arizona.edu]
  • : No treatment of OI Varied prognosis 18 19.[slideshare.net]
  • Information about a therapy, service, product or treatment does not in any way endorse or support such therapy, service, product or treatment and is not intended to replace advice from your doctor or other registered health professional.[betterhealth.vic.gov.au]
  • It also reviews its contemporary and future treatment options with the objective of rendering comprehensive care through a multidisciplinary approach.[austinpublishinggroup.com]

Prognosis

  • Treatment• Marked widening and distortion of alveolar ridges • Prognosis is unpredictable• Tooth displacement and eruption failure • Delayed till after puberty (curettage) 2 3.[slideshare.net]
  • The overall prognosis of Nager AFD is good and after infancy most patients are healthy and presumed to have normal life span.[jofs.in]
  • Depending upon how extensive the organ involvement, the prognosis is usually guarded and patients may not live beyond early childhood. It is uncertain if IFAP refers to a single disorder or if two disorders are involved (see Genetics).[disorders.eyes.arizona.edu]

Etiology

  • الصفحة 53 - A longitudinal study of respiratory viruses and bacteria in the etiology of acute otitis media with effusion - Henderson FW, Collier AM, Sanyal MA et al. ‏[books.google.com]
  • Etiology is related to the alteration of genes involved in the process of enamel formation and maturation. This is exclusively an ectodermal disorder; mesodermal tissues such as dentin and cementum are not affected.[quizlet.com]

Epidemiology

  • Definitions, differential diagnosis, and epidemiology. Am J Surg Pathol 1996; 20(1):103-111. ‏ الصفحة 91 - Everett LA, Glaser B, Beck JC, Idol JR. Buchs A, Heyman M, Adawi F, Hazani E, Nassir E.[books.google.com]
  • Each age-specific section covers the physical, cognitive, emotional, and social changes that children experience, as well as the epidemiology of dental disease at that age.[books.google.com]
Sex distribution
Age distribution

Pathophysiology

  • For detailed information about rare diseases (pathophysiology, treatment options), treatment centres, and patient organisations, visit Orphanet (www.orpha.net) to find information about more than 5.000 rare diseases.[orphananesthesia.eu]

Prevention

  • Other chapters explore the examination, treatment planning, radiographic concerns, prevention, trauma, restorative dentistry, pulp therapy, orthodontics, and behavior management of each age range.[books.google.com]
  • Generally, Treacher Collins syndrome may lead to complications including: Feeding problems – the cleft palate prevents the baby from suckling and swallowing.[betterhealth.vic.gov.au]
  • […] descent of the tongue into the oral cavity; prevents secondary palate fusion Associated with a syndrome in 50-80% of cases, most commonly Stickler & VCF syndromes 19 Pierre-Robin Sequence Figure Robin sequence.[slideplayer.com]
  • Genetics, Genetic Counseling, and Prevention 4. Minor Anomalies: Clues to More Serious Problems and to the Recognition of Malformation Syndromes 5. Normal Standards Appendix I Pattern of Malformation Differential Diagnosis by Anomalies show more[bookdepository.com]
  • Impacted teeth, Multiple odontomas can occur in jawbones, Intestinal polyps occur that will become malignant at age 30 or later, Patients with a known family history of Gardner syndrome often receive prophylactic colectomy upon recognition of the polyps to prevent[quizlet.com]

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